Burbuja.info - Foro de economía > > > Banca: (Zero Edge) Cómo la reserva federal ha rescatado a los bancos europeos
Respuesta
 
Herramientas Desplegado
  #1  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 17:30
Tuttle Tuttle está desconectado
ir-
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 28-marzo-2007
Ubicación: Princesado de Asturias
Mensajes: 22.764
Gracias: 12.283
25.801 Agradecimientos de 8.245 mensajes
How The Fed's Latest QE Is Just Another European Bailout

How The Fed's Latest QE Is Just Another European Bailout | Zero Hedge

Back in June 2011 Zero Hedge broke a very troubling story: virtually all the reserves that had been created as a result of the Fed's QE2, some $600 billion (which two years ago seemed like a lot of money) which was supposed to force banks to create loans and stimulate the US (not European) economy, ended up becoming cash at what the Fed classifies as "foreign-related institutions in the US" (or "foreign banks" as used in this article) on its weekly update of commercial banks operating in the US, or said simply, European banks.



And while many, primarily the British press, demonstrated how simple it is to confuse cause and effect, and suggested, incorrectly, that the surge in cash was due to arbing the Fed's IOER (it wasn't, as otherwise all excess reserves would have migrated to European banks due to the open-ended arbitrage instead of merely tracking the ebb and flow of the Fed's reserves), what we showed was that there a one to one correlation between the surge in foreign bank cash assets courtesy of the Fed, and the EURUSD exchange rate, a proxy for European stability, not to mention a key signal for virtually every ES correlation algo.



As the chart above shows, there was a clear and definite correlation, if not causation, between the $500 billion that the Fed added as cash to European foreign banks, and the nearly 2000 pip move in the EURUSD, at which point everyone was pronouncing the European crisis over. It also resulted in a wholesale surge in risk assets. Just like now (incidentally, a topic we covered last night).

So with the Fed's open-ended QE in place for over 3 months now, or long enough for the nearly $200 billion in MBS already purchased to begin settling on Bernanke's balance sheet, we decided to check if, just like during QE2, the Fed was merely funding European banks' US-based subsidiaries with massive cash, which would then proceed to use said fungible cash to indicate an "all clear" courtesy of Bernanke's easy money. Just like in 2011.

The answer, to our complete lack of surprise, is a resounding yes.

* * *

First, some basics.

While there is much theoretical confusion over what excess reserves are, which are merely the fungible cash-equivalent liabilities created on the Fed's balance sheet whenever Ben Bernanke has to monetize the US deficit by purchasing Treasurys or MBS, and thus needs to create offsetting money-equivalent liabilities, especially by academics whose only job day and night is to debate endlessly just what constitutes "money" as their value added in any other field is negative, from a practical standpoint the answer is and has always been one and the same. Cash.

And because there is always confusion on this matter, especially by the monetary intelligentsia-cum-philosopshers club, here is the evidence. Excess reserves = bank cash. Bank cash = excess reserves.

In the chart above, the black line is the surge in Fed excess reserves since September 2009 (source: St Louis Fed), while the shaded area chart shows the break down of bank cash between small domestic, large domestic commercial banks and foreign banks (source: H.8). The two are identical.

So that should remove any of the the confusion of where the the Fed's main de novo created liability ends up as an asset on commercial banks operating in the US - both domestically-chartered and foreign ones.

But the focus of this post is the foreign banks. And it is foreign banks that have seen their cash soar by some $207 billion in the past four weeks (and $216 billion using not seasonally adjusted numbers). This is the second highest monthly surge into "foreign-related" institutions since the bailout of AIG, and is even more on a running 4-week basis than the maximum $171 billion posted in the spring of 2011 when the Fed was injecting some $500 billion into foreign banks as well.



Another exhibit showing just how generous the Fed has been to foreign bank is a chart of cash compare to all non-cash assets. After nearly hitting 100% as a result of QE2, the ratio has once again soared from 60% to just over 80% in the span of four weeks, or since the settlement of MBS monetizations started hitting the Fed's balance sheet.



Perhaps all of this soaring cash is merely the result of a massive inflow of deposits (a liability) into foreign banks without a matching increase in loans (the much discussed previously excess deposits over loans topic), which only leaves cash? The answer is no, as excess deposits over loans at foreign banks has kept flat over the past year, at between $200 and $300 billion.



And in case the big picture is still not obvious, here is the chart that ties it all together: a comparison of the spike in Fed excess reserves and the cash held by foreign banks. Thank you open-ended QE, and Fed Chairman, for injecting over $200 billion in US Dollars into foreign banks operating on US soil.



What is interesting about the chart above is that while cash and small domestic banks has barely budged since 2009 and has been flat at just over $200 billion, and that cash at Large US Domestic banks, or those that hold the bulk of US financial assets, has also been relatively flat in the $500-600 billion area, it is the foreign banks that any new incremental reserves created by the Fed always inevitably end up at ever since QE2.



As shown above, cash held by foreign-related branches operating in the US has surpassed that of domestic banks only for the fourth time in history, the first being the end of QE2 when Europe was again "fixed" (just before it broke), the second was just before the coordinated central bank bailout of Europe in November 2011, the third was May 2012 just before Spanish spreads soared to record highs, and now.

With all of the above, anyone who was wondering where all those hundreds of billions in Fed cash created out of thin air were going now knows the answer: straight into the coffers of mostly European banks operating in the US.

* * *

The only answer that is still missing is precisely what these foreign banks are using said cash for. Because remember that as JPM's CIO showed, a bank can "indicate" it has cash on its books, when in reality it is using said fungible asset for anything: funding one's prop operations, including selling IG9 CDS in a borderline illegal attempt to corner the entire corporate bond market. Or it can perhaps buy the USDJPY, in the process sending the Nikkei soaring and "indicating" that Abe's reflation plan is working. Or it can simply buy the EURUSD as it did in the spring of 2011, crushing the USD and sending the S&P500 soaring, as can be seen on the chart below showing the correlation between the cash on foreign banks and the recent surge in EURUSD.



And while we are confident that the "British press", which is now reliant on Wall Street banks to help it find the highest bidder to which it can sell itself, will promptly come up with contrarian theories all of which will be wrong as they were in 2011, the reality is simple, and can easily be tracked in real time.

We urge readers to check the weekly status of the H.8 when it comes out every Friday night, and specifically line item 25 on page 18, as we have a sinking feeling that as the Fed creates $85 billion in reserves every month to offset its other key task - the ongoing monetization of the US deficit, it will do just one thing: hand the cash right over straight to still hopelessly insolvent European banks to push the EURUSD higher, until, as in the summer of 2011 it goes far too high, crushes German, and any other net European exports, and precipitates yet another wholesale bailout of Europe by the global central bankers. Just as the Fed did in 2011.

Because remember: it is never different this time.

Ver el original para los enlaces del texto.

Última edición por Tuttle; 03-feb-2013 a las 17:41


Responder Citando
Estos 4 usuarios dan las gracias a Tuttle por su mensaje:
  #2  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 17:39
euriborfree euriborfree está desconectado
ir-
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-agosto-2007
Ubicación: Wasteland
Mensajes: 20.889
Gracias: 2.453
26.796 Agradecimientos de 9.540 mensajes
Es una consecuencia de ser moneda de reserva de todo el mundo.


Responder Citando
  #3  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 17:44
Proteus Proteus está desconectado
Ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 26-octubre-2011
Ubicación: Mordor
Mensajes: 5.907
Gracias: 7.197
12.028 Agradecimientos de 3.668 mensajes
Relacionado:

El efecto de los QE cada vez es menor
Cuando el acuerdo sobre el techo de la deuda en 2011 se regulaba por 18 meses (13), el fiscal cliff sólo prorroga el problema por 2 meses. Mientras que los efectos del QE1 se percibieron durante un año, el QE3 tuvo efecto sólo por algunas semanas (14)… Además con la agenda cargada de futuras negociaciones, vemos que el tiempo se acelera significativamente, señal que el precipicio se acerca y con ello el nerviosismo de los actores.

Resultado en el S&P500 durante las diferentes operaciones de cuantitative easing - Fuente: ZeroHedge/SocGen

Nota publica de GEAB N°71 (17 de enero de 2013)


Responder Citando
Estos usuarios dan las gracias a Proteus por su mensaje:
  #4  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 18:04
Tuttle Tuttle está desconectado
ir-
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 28-marzo-2007
Ubicación: Princesado de Asturias
Mensajes: 22.764
Gracias: 12.283
25.801 Agradecimientos de 8.245 mensajes
Esto parece explicar el influjo de capitales del que tanto se vanagloriaba el gobierno.


Responder Citando
  #5  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 18:28
pelotazo_especulativo pelotazo_especulativo está desconectado
Excelentísimo, ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de élite de los gurús burbujistas
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 22-septiembre-2011
Mensajes: 7.632
Gracias: 6.191
16.390 Agradecimientos de 4.686 mensajes
Todos los gráficos muy bien, pero es la misma historia de siempre si lo he entendido bien.

La FED imprime nuevo dinero, se lo presta al Gobierno y este lo utiliza para "estimular" la economía poniendolo en los balances de los bancos comerciales domésticos usanos, todo ello respaldado por la promesa de pago del gobierno. Una vez han hecho este proceso varias veces, se han subido artificialmente los indices bursátiles, esos mismos bancos comerciales han comprado bonos, etc El dinero fluye hasta los bancos europeos,
Dichos bancos reciben USD y compran Euros, por lo que se crea una distorsión en el cambio EUR/USD, inflando artificialmente al primero.

Lo siguiente es crear otra burbuja para seguir con el patadón p´alante, quizá en Asia , quizá en en Middle East...


Todo esto es un poco imprevisible, pero se sostiene en una sola premisa, y es que el USD sigue siendo aceptado, por el momento, como pago por bienes y servicios alrededor del mundo, pero esto no va a durar eternamente.

En Europa se están siguiendo en general políticas de ajuste, en los USA no, y el ajuste al final se tendrá que hacer sí o sí porque esta política no va a poder durar eternamente.

De momento le dan a la impresora, pero en el futuro tendrán que o subir impuestos, o recortar gastos , o hacerles un simpa a los chinos o montarse una nueva GM.


Responder Citando
Estos 3 usuarios dan las gracias a pelotazo_especulativo por su mensaje:
  #6  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 18:39
Tuttle Tuttle está desconectado
ir-
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 28-marzo-2007
Ubicación: Princesado de Asturias
Mensajes: 22.764
Gracias: 12.283
25.801 Agradecimientos de 8.245 mensajes
Iniciado por pelotazo_especulativo Ver Mensaje
...

La FED imprime nuevo dinero, se lo presta al Gobierno y este lo utiliza para "estimular" la economía poniendolo en los balances de los bancos comerciales domésticos usanos, todo ello respaldado por la promesa de pago del gobierno. Una vez han hecho este proceso varias veces, se han subido artificialmente los indices bursátiles, esos mismos bancos comerciales han comprado bonos, etc El dinero fluye hasta los bancos europeos,
Dichos bancos reciben USD y compran Euros, por lo que se crea una distorsión en el cambio EUR/USD, inflando artificialmente al primero.

...

No exactamente, lo que viene a decir es que la reserva federal ha financiado a los bancos europeos que operan en EEUU ya que la relación prestamos, depósitos se ha mantenido constante.

Perhaps all of this soaring cash is merely the result of a massive inflow of deposits (a liability) into foreign banks without a matching increase in loans (the much discussed previously excess deposits over loans topic), which only leaves cash? The answer is no, as excess deposits over loans at foreign banks has kept flat over the past year, at between $200 and $300 billion.



Responder Citando
Estos usuarios dan las gracias a Tuttle por su mensaje:
  #7  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 18:40
pep007 pep007 está desconectado
Grandísimo Gurú burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 13-abril-2007
Ubicación: majorica
Mensajes: 3.671
Gracias: 2.757
4.752 Agradecimientos de 1.611 mensajes
Si es que el dólar y el euro son como el PP y el PSOE.


Responder Citando
Estos usuarios dan las gracias a pep007 por su mensaje:
  #8  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 19:35
pelotazo_especulativo pelotazo_especulativo está desconectado
Excelentísimo, ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de élite de los gurús burbujistas
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 22-septiembre-2011
Mensajes: 7.632
Gracias: 6.191
16.390 Agradecimientos de 4.686 mensajes
Iniciado por Tuttle Ver Mensaje
No exactamente, lo que viene a decir es que la reserva federal ha financiado a los bancos europeos que operan en EEUU ya que la relación prestamos, depósitos se ha mantenido constante.

No soy experto en el tema, ni me fio mucho de los datos, puesto que todos vienen dados y cocinados por los mismos que han creado en este problema.

Lo lógico, en una situación normal, sería que el ratio depósitos/préstamos fuese aproximadamente constante. Si se le deja pasta a tal o cual entidad, lo lógico es que exista una contrapartida a esa inyección en forma de obligación de pago futura. En una situación de expansión crediticia, el ratio depositos/prestamos decrecería, y en una de contracción, crecería

El sistema no es transparente ni muy comprensible, puesto que muchos bancos también tienen pasta metida en el Sistema bancario en la sombra - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre , como mismo se comenta en uno de los comentarios del post original.

El artículo también denota cierta parcialidad, puesto que parece insinuar que Europa ha "fallado" y que los sufridos usanos intentan ayudarla, cuando que la raiz del problema es su propio sistema monetario que ha creado toneladas de dinero sin respaldo que se ha canalizado al mercado de derivados y que ahora es una especie de caja negra a la que nadie quiere/puede meter mano.

Cual es pues el objetivo de este "cash" que se le ha "dado" a los bancos europeos que operan en territorio usano? Que importancia tiene que sean bancos europeos y no usanos?


Responder Citando
  #9  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 20:00
Tuttle Tuttle está desconectado
ir-
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 28-marzo-2007
Ubicación: Princesado de Asturias
Mensajes: 22.764
Gracias: 12.283
25.801 Agradecimientos de 8.245 mensajes
Iniciado por pelotazo_especulativo Ver Mensaje
No soy experto en el tema, ni me fio mucho de los datos, puesto que todos vienen dados y cocinados por los mismos que han creado en este problema.

Lo lógico, en una situación normal, sería que el ratio depósitos/préstamos fuese aproximadamente constante. Si se le deja pasta a tal o cual entidad, lo lógico es que exista una contrapartida a esa inyección en forma de obligación de pago futura. En una situación de expansión crediticia, el ratio depositos/prestamos decrecería, y en una de contracción, crecería

Lo que yo entiendo es que si se han incrementado los depósitos y la diferencia se mantiene constante es que esos depósitos provienen de la compra de deuda de estos bancos.

El sistema no es transparente ni muy comprensible, puesto que muchos bancos también tienen pasta metida en el Sistema bancario en la sombra - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre , como mismo se comenta en uno de los comentarios del post original.

El artículo también denota cierta parcialidad, puesto que parece insinuar que Europa ha "fallado" y que los sufridos usanos intentan ayudarla, cuando que la raiz del problema es su propio sistema monetario que ha creado toneladas de dinero sin respaldo que se ha canalizado al mercado de derivados y que ahora es una especie de caja negra a la que nadie quiere/puede meter mano.

Cual es pues el objetivo de este "cash" que se le ha "dado" a los bancos europeos que operan en territorio usano? Que importancia tiene que sean bancos europeos y no usanos?

Pues que están rescatando a bancos extranjeros, es decir están ejerciendo de prestamista de último recurso para bancos que dependen de otros bancos centrales. Para que quemar el euro y el dolar si se puede quemar solo el dolar.


Responder Citando
  #10  
Antiguo 03-feb-2013, 22:02
pelotazo_especulativo pelotazo_especulativo está desconectado
Excelentísimo, ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de élite de los gurús burbujistas
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 22-septiembre-2011
Mensajes: 7.632
Gracias: 6.191
16.390 Agradecimientos de 4.686 mensajes
Iniciado por Tuttle Ver Mensaje
Lo que yo entiendo es que si se han incrementado los depósitos y la diferencia se mantiene constante es que esos depósitos provienen de la compra de deuda de estos bancos.


Pues que están rescatando a bancos extranjeros, es decir están ejerciendo de prestamista de último recurso para bancos que dependen de otros bancos centrales. Para que quemar el euro y el dolar si se puede quemar solo el dolar.

A día de hoy las pérdidas de los bancos vienen de una única fuente, que ha sido la creación de dinero sin respaldo, y que se ha canalizado, a mi modo de ver en 2 grandes ramas, que serían el mercado inmobiliario y el mercado de derivados.

El mercado inmobiliario es "fácil" de controlar porque es observable y existen ciertos patrones históricos para conocer cual es el precio objetivo que se ha de alcanzar, se conoce quienes son sus compradores y se puede hacer un seguimiento, aunque sea subjetivo, de la psicología de masas.

Ahora, el mercado de derivados, es el gran desconocido al menos para mi, son una serie de productos ofertados a particulares, inversores institucionales, los propios bancos, etc y que no parecen tener pies ni cabeza desde un punto de vista de análisis fundamental, tan solo un conjunto de productos apalancados, indexados unos a otros mediante fórmulas matemáticas y estadísticas y probablemente insolventes en caso de tener que materializarse ( tales como los CDS ).

Supongo que este dinero que se da para cubrir pérdidas debe estar más relacionado con el mercado de derivados que el inmobiliario, pero es un tema en el que la información es confusa y manipulada, o al menos esa es mi impresión.


Responder Citando
Estos usuarios dan las gracias a pelotazo_especulativo por su mensaje:
Respuesta

Herramientas
Desplegado


Temas Similares
Tema Autor Foro Respuestas Último mensaje
La Reserva Federal regaló dinero a varios bancos en plena crisis chinito_deslocalizador Burbuja Inmobiliaria 3 26-may-2011 18:45
La Reserva Federal regaló dinero a varios bancos en plena crisis dekka Burbuja Inmobiliaria 1 26-may-2011 18:38
AIG ocultó pagos a bancos a petición de la Reserva Federal en plena crisis enric68 Burbuja Inmobiliaria 0 08-ene-2010 09:44
... Y la Reserva Federal entrega nuevas subvenciones a los bancos JAC 59 Burbuja Inmobiliaria 2 04-ago-2009 10:32
Los secretos sucios del templo: de cómo la Reserva Federal de USA y los bancos maneja Maradono Burbuja Inmobiliaria 7 28-ene-2007 17:41


La franja horaria es GMT +1. Ahora son las 03:32.