Burbuja.info - Foro de economía > > > The economist - muy buen articulo
Respuesta
 
Herramientas Desplegado
  #1  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:06
Expatriado por la burbuja Expatriado por la burbuja está desconectado
Multinick Premium
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 22-junio-2006
Mensajes: 218
Gracias: 0
Agradecido 14 veces en 1 mensaje
The euro area's economy

Beggar thy neighbour
Jan 25th 2007
From The Economist print edition

Germany's economy has regained its lost competitiveness, but it may come at the expense of Spain, where wages are rising fast
Satoshi Kambayashi
THE economy of the euro area is basking in a rare period of optimism. Growth forecasts ended the year higher than at the start of the year, the first time this has happened since 2000. The growth differential with America's economy has narrowed and is expected to contract further this year. But in an economy that comprises 13 diverse nations, such blessings are rarely unmixed. A particular concern is that the recent resurgence at the euro zone's core could portend a protracted slump at its periphery.

Germany has been the source of much of the recent good news in Europe. For so long a laggard in the euro area, its economy is now growing faster than the regional average. Unemployment, though still high, has dropped sharply in the last two years. The latest survey from Ifo, a Munich economic-research institute, shows that business confidence remains close to a 15-year high. Exports and business investment are doing well. Understandable doubts remain about the durability of Germany's revival: consumer spending has so far failed to take off convincingly.

Yet arguably the German economy is on a sounder footing than at any time since reunification (see article). Germany's recovery in cost competitiveness has been crucial to its reviving fortunes. Declining real wages and a modest upswing in productivity have together produced a sustained drop in unit labour costs. Lower wage costs, in turn, have helped boost exports and jobs.

Hope for a lasting German recovery is mixed with concern about the outlook for countries where wage discipline has been less strict. In Italy and Portugal, for example, a combination of strong wage increases and weak productivity growth has undermined cost competitiveness.

The same cocktail of higher wages and sluggish productivity clouds the outlook for one of the fastest-growing European economies: Spain. In the last decade, its economy has expanded by an average of 3.7% a year, nearly twice the rate for the whole euro zone. Spanish demand has been driven by housing and credit booms that are vulnerable to higher interest rates. But high labour costs may in the end prove to be Spain's undoing. In a report published this week the OECD, while applauding Spain's “remarkable” performance, noted that its relatively high inflation had undermined its competitiveness.

Olivier Blanchard, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, sees Spain as a plausible next victim of what he calls “the rotating slumps under the euro”. In his view, the euro area is characterised by a succession of booms and busts, each in a single country. A typical stop-go cycle starts with a localised increase in demand, which in turn leads to higher wages, lost competitiveness and finally to a protracted downturn. Since short-term interest rates in the euro area are not tailored to individual countries' cycles, monetary policy can attenuate neither boom nor bust.

In Mr Blanchard's model, the slump migrates across the currency zone according to shifts in relative wage costs. A long period of above-average wage growth that goes unmatched by productivity gains will eventually leave a country at a significant cost disadvantage.

Germany's recent history shows how hard it is for a member of the euro club to recover from a cost-induced slump. Devaluation might have been an obvious remedy, but can only be achieved by leaving the currency union. The only other solution is to drive down wage costs relative to those in competing countries. This option is also costly: Germans have paid the price in terms of high unemployment and stunted growth. Cost reduction is also painfully slow. Workers are resistant to pay cuts, so the necessary reduction in real wages relies on a long period of below-average inflation. This kind of wage discipline has underpinned Germany's revival.

An increase in productivity growth, a more recent trend, has given German competitiveness a further boost. Output per hour in Germany rose by 2% last year, according to a report published on January 23rd by the Conference Board, a business organisation. Such vigour has put further distance between Germany and its trading partners to the south. Spain's performance is particularly dismal. Output per hour there fell by 0.5% last year, continuing a negative trend that dates back to the mid-1990s.

For Mr Blanchard, Spain is at a potentially dangerous point in the relative-cost cycle. Wages are still rising at a rate roughly twice the euro zone's average and well ahead of productivity growth. Spain's real exchange rate is up by nearly a quarter since 2000 (see chart). But so far the economy shows few symptoms of ill health. GDP probably grew by 3.6% last year and forecasts for this year suggest only a modest slowdown.

One clear sign of something amiss is Spain's current-account deficit, which widened to 8.8% of GDP last year, estimates the OECD. Such imbalances can reflect shifts in competitiveness and warn of trouble ahead—especially, perhaps, in a currency union where the costs of wage adjustment are high. Within America, by contrast, cost imbalances are resolved less painfully, because workers are willing to move from depressed states to where jobs are more plentiful.

Portugal's ballooning trade deficit in the late 1990s was a symptom of declining competitiveness and the economy has yet to recover from the subsequent bust. Spain now has the second-largest current-account deficit in the world in dollar terms and looks dangerously overheated. Germany's resurgence has set a challenge for the euro zone's southern members. Without the option of devaluation, their medium-term outlook looks less than rosy.


Responder Citando
  #2  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:08
Mi_casa_es_tu_casa Mi_casa_es_tu_casa está desconectado
Ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 19-julio-2006
Ubicación: BCN
Mensajes: 5.495
Gracias: 0
45 Agradecimientos de 30 mensajes
Gracias, ahora lo leo. He mirado la fuente pero al parecer la página es de acceso exclusivo a suscriptores...


Responder Citando
  #3  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:14
Neu___ Neu___ está desconectado
Super Mario
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 05-diciembre-2006
Mensajes: 1.919
Gracias: 65
939 Agradecimientos de 411 mensajes
For Mr Blanchard, Spain is at a potentially dangerous point in the relative-cost cycle. Wages are still rising at a rate roughly twice the euro zone's average and well ahead of productivity growth. Spain's real exchange rate is up by nearly a quarter since 2000 (see chart). But so far the economy shows few symptoms of ill health. GDP probably grew by 3.6% last year and forecasts for this year suggest only a modest slowdown.

Osease, que para el señor blanchard, España es peligrosa, baja productividad, y aunque 3,6% de subida en el GDP (intuyo que es el P.I.B), la cosa parece que va a frenar. (slowdown)


Responder Citando
  #4  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:18
El paleto El paleto está desconectado
Excelentísimo, ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de élite de los gurús burbujistas
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 29-septiembre-2006
Mensajes: 9.941
Gracias: 205
5.706 Agradecimientos de 2.162 mensajes
Excelente artículo que alimenta nuestros peores presagios. El artículo parece estar sacado de burbuja.info pero no es así. El Instituto de Tecnología de Massachuset es uno de los más importantes del mundo.

La conclusión del artículo es bien sencilla, “España está al borde del precipicio”. Se destaca del resto ampliamente, y eso no podemos negarlo….

No solamente nos hundimos nosotros, sino que arrastraremos al área euro también.


Responder Citando
  #5  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:20
Mi_casa_es_tu_casa Mi_casa_es_tu_casa está desconectado
Ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 19-julio-2006
Ubicación: BCN
Mensajes: 5.495
Gracias: 0
45 Agradecimientos de 30 mensajes
For Mr Blanchard, Spain is at a potentially dangerous point in the relative-cost cycle. Wages are still rising at a rate roughly twice the euro zone's average and well ahead of productivity growth. Spain's real exchange rate is up by nearly a quarter since 2000 (see chart). But so far the economy shows few symptoms of ill health. GDP probably grew by 3.6% last year and forecasts for this year suggest only a modest slowdown.

Es cierto que los sueldos pueden aumentar pero siguen siendo bajos en comparación con el resto de paises desarrollados de la UE.
El artículo es muy realista, y aunque advierte del peligro de sobrecalentamiento de la economía española no se atreve a marcar el punto de explosión.

Estoy sobre todo de acuerdo con la teoría del balanceo dentro de la UE. A partir de ahora Alemania va mejor, España a peor.. La UE no es un ente homogeneo!! Y al contrario de los EEUU aquí no es nada fácil que los trabajadores emigren de un pais a otro, por problemas linguisticos y culturales.

Desde luego, el factor que veo más a corto plazo como desencadenador de la explosión de la burbuja inmobiliaria (además de medidas políticas de las que por ahora desconfío hasta que no las vea plasmadas en leyes Y EJECUTADAS, me refiero al canon de pisos vacíos) es LA SUBIDA DE LOS TIPOS DE INTERÉS.


Responder Citando
  #6  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:31
Miss Marple Miss Marple está desconectado
más allá de la burbuja
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-junio-2006
Ubicación: Vigàta
Mensajes: 4.023
Gracias: 585
19.316 Agradecimientos de 1.891 mensajes
Olivier Blanchard, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, sees Spain as a plausible next victim of what he calls “the rotating slumps under the euro”. In his view, the euro area is characterised by a succession of booms and busts, each in a single country. A typical stop-go cycle starts with a localised increase in demand, which in turn leads to higher wages, lost competitiveness and finally to a protracted downturn. Since short-term interest rates in the euro area are not tailored to individual countries' cycles, monetary policy can attenuate neither boom nor bust.

Que los tipos de interés no se ajustan a los ciclos de ningún país individual no es del todo cierto. Se ajustan mucho más a las necesidades de Alemania que las de nadie más, con consecuencias potencialmente catastróficas para otras economías que van con el ciclo cambiado.


Responder Citando
  #7  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:37
aleg aleg está desconectado
wapissimo
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 13-julio-2006
Mensajes: 165
Gracias: 1
34 Agradecimientos de 19 mensajes
Iniciado por Neu___
For Mr Blanchard, Spain is at a potentially dangerous point in the relative-cost cycle. Wages are still rising at a rate roughly twice the euro zone's average and well ahead of productivity growth. Spain's real exchange rate is up by nearly a quarter since 2000 (see chart). But so far the economy shows few symptoms of ill health. GDP probably grew by 3.6% last year and forecasts for this year suggest only a modest slowdown.

Osease, que para el señor blanchard, España es peligrosa, baja productividad, y aunque 3,6% de subida en el GDP (intuyo que es el P.I.B), la cosa parece que va a frenar. (slowdown)

Efectivamente GDP = Gross Domestic Product = PIB = Producto Interior Bruto
GNI = Gross National Income = PNB = Procucto Nacional Bruto


Responder Citando
  #8  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:41
astur_burbuja astur_burbuja está desconectado
Grandísimo Gurú burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-septiembre-2006
Mensajes: 3.751
Gracias: 11.174
10.164 Agradecimientos de 2.398 mensajes
No entiendo mucho de conomia, pero me llama la atencion la obsesión de todos los economistas (y me llamas mas aun la de los extranjeros) por el control de los suledos, y siempre diciendo que en España los sueldos crecen demasiado.

Osea, que para esta gente que el 60% de la poblacion activa gane menos de 900 brutos al mes es mucho. Entonces en sus queridos paises anglosajones, donde 900 € los gana un vagabundo en la calle, y el mas tontaina cvn el sueldo minimo llega a los 1300 € tanquilamente por 39 horas semanales, que cojones pasa????? Tendrian que estar en la ruina.

Que se dejen de historias. Lo insostenible en la economia española es dedicar el fruto del trabajo de 15 millones de personas durante 10 años a alicatar 800 km de costa sin ningun tipo de control, y bajo el maravilloso lema tan español y ya historico de : "QUE INVENTE OTROS".

pd: La solucion es la moderacion en los beneficios de las multinacionales, no de los suledos.


Responder Citando
  #9  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:51
Expatriado por la burbuja Expatriado por la burbuja está desconectado
Multinick Premium
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 22-junio-2006
Mensajes: 218
Gracias: 0
Agradecido 14 veces en 1 mensaje
Es mas barato pagar a un trabajador 2.000 euros al mes si por contra produce bienes por 20.000 euros que pagarle 800 euros a uno que produce 100 Euros. Por ello la productividad es la clave . En un pais con una productividad baja el futuro pasa por congelar los sueldos hasta que la productividad este en consonancia con los sueldos.....

No quiero decir con esto que los espanoles sean vagos, solo que los sueldos son demasiado altos en relacion a lo que producen.

Iniciado por astur_burbuja
No entiendo mucho de conomia, pero me llama la atencion la obsesión de todos los economistas (y me llamas mas aun la de los extranjeros) por el control de los suledos, y siempre diciendo que en España los sueldos crecen demasiado.

Osea, que para esta gente que el 60% de la poblacion activa gane menos de 900 brutos al mes es mucho. Entonces en sus queridos paises anglosajones, donde 900 € los gana un vagabundo en la calle, y el mas tontaina cvn el sueldo minimo llega a los 1300 € tanquilamente por 39 horas semanales, que cojones pasa????? Tendrian que estar en la ruina.

Que se dejen de historias. Lo insostenible en la economia española es dedicar el fruto del trabajo de 15 millones de personas durante 10 años a alicatar 800 km de costa sin ningun tipo de control, y bajo el maravilloso lema tan español y ya historico de : "QUE INVENTE OTROS".

pd: La solucion es la moderacion en los beneficios de las multinacionales, no de los suledos.



Responder Citando
  #10  
Antiguo 26-ene-2007, 11:52
Akistoy Akistoy está desconectado
Polemico
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-mayo-2006
Mensajes: 850
Gracias: 11
115 Agradecimientos de 72 mensajes
Pues si España ha ido bien la ultima decada no quiero ni pensar que pasara cuando vaya mal... La clase media se estudiara en la clase de historia porque ya no quedara nadie.


Responder Citando
Respuesta

Herramientas
Desplegado


Temas Similares
Tema Autor Foro Respuestas Último mensaje
Nuevo Articulo The Economist Interesante !!! quedapoco Burbuja Inmobiliaria 4 21-jun-2011 20:40
Articulo en The Economist Diegales Burbuja Inmobiliaria 6 06-abr-2009 17:23
Interesante artículo del The Economist Aqui_No_Hay_Quien_Viva Burbuja Inmobiliaria 3 21-mar-2007 13:17
ArtÍculo En The Economist No Registrado Burbuja Inmobiliaria 12 27-feb-2007 18:56
Artículo de The Economist mikele666 Burbuja Inmobiliaria 15 09-feb-2007 23:24


La franja horaria es GMT +1. Ahora son las 01:50.