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Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 22:17
no vendo ná no vendo ná esta en línea ahora
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
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Del foro de idealista:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article...9-2278655.html

Pirates of the Mediterranean
It’s a second home to millions of British people, but what are we buying into? For Spain has become a country full of corrupt politicians, prostitutes and gangsters — all fuelled by laundered money. By Stephen Burgen


Spain is different.” So said that famous Spanish tourist-authority slogan – and so it is, though not in the ways they want to crow about. The sun, sea and sangria destination that attracts 55m tourists a year has, over the past four or five years, acquired a dark underbelly, as the demand for a place in the sun has turned Spain into the money-laundering capital of Europe. Vast sums amassed through arms-smuggling, drugs and prostitution are being recycled into holiday homes for us British and other north Europeans.

Three headlines that have appeared during the past few months sum up what has been happening here since 2001, the year before the introduction of the euro: “Spain, Europe’s brothel”, proclaimed El Pais. “Spain, Europe’s second home”, said La Vanguardia. “Black money gathers strength in Spain”, ran a story, also in El Pais.



“People come to Spain to launder their money because there is an end market made up of people who want to take up residence here. Everyone depends on the end user, the Mr and Mrs Smith from Britain. That’s the way it works,” says Antonio Flores, a property lawyer in Marbella, a town which has become a paradigm of the corrupting power of the dirty money washing up on Spain’s Mediterranean shore.

Various events and forces – the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Balkan wars and the peculiar characteristics of the Spanish economy – have combined to bring organised crime, practically nonexistent here before the mid-1990s, to Spain. The other is the euro. Sometime before “E-day” on January 1, 2002, a lot of people woke up to the fact that the francs, deutschmarks and pesetas under the mattress were about to become worthless, so they looked around for ways of converting them into something more durable. What they found was property, and in Spain they found not only a booming property market but a culture where, thanks to a stamp duty of around 10%, almost every property transaction involves a degree of black money as both buyer and seller agree on a lower, fictitious official price, and settle the difference in cash.

All property transactions in Spain are overseen by a public notary, who takes care of conveyancing and pockets 2.5% of the purchase price. When it comes to completing the transaction, the notary will clear his throat and announce that he has to go to the lavatory, thus allowing the parties to complete whatever part of the deal is being done in cash without having to witness it himself. Everyone does it, rich and poor alike.

According to the Bank of Spain, in 2001, 100,000 Spanish properties changed hands for cash. In June, the Agencia Tributaria (Spain’s Inland Revenue) announced that it was trying to recover tax on €11 billion that changed hands during the first nine months of 2001, most of it spent on property, luxury cars and works of art. Critics of the tax department say that there was a Europe-wide agreement to turn a blind eye to money-laundering in 2001 so as to smooth the transition to the new money.

“There’s a big difference between the person who had some money stashed in a sock in francs or deutschmarks and needed to get rid of them before the euro, many of whom did so by buying property, and the huge sums we’re dealing with now that originate in drug-trafficking or the traffic of arms or human beings. These are people who are looking for legitimate ways to recycle their dirty money,” says Ines Barba, a criminal lawyer in Malaga. Leaving aside the fact that €11 billion would fill a pretty big sock, the point she is making is that the pre-euro spree opened people’s eyes to Spain’s potential as a place to launder money. “The suitcases of money didn’t start arriving until after the euro was introduced,” says Antonio Flores.

In the days of the peseta you needed a big suitcase, if not a sea trunk, but with the advent of the euro and the €500 note (worth about £345), even a small briefcase can fit millions. In a new twist on drug mules, women transport cash back to eastern Europe in condoms stuffed with €500 notes which are inserted into their vaginas. When the deputy mayor of Marbella, Isabel Garcia Marcos, was arrested, police found €350,000 worth of €500 notes in her house. Nearly two-thirds of all the €500 notes in circulation in the EU are to be found in Spain.

In 2005 the police investigations into organised crime and money-laundering led to the confiscation of €4 billion in money and property, a hundredfold increase on the year 2000. This increase is attributed not just to the euro. While at first the money was brought into the country from criminal operations conducted abroad, now, increasingly, the money originates from criminal activities in Spain. Bear in mind that Spain is the main European entry point for hashish from Morocco and cocaine from Latin America. Cocaine busts in Spain, typically in the northwest province of Galicia, where many have family links to South America, tend to be measured in tonnes, not kilograms. Recorded crime, however, remains low, at 49.3 offences per 1,000 inhabitants, about 20 points below the EU average.

Javier Gaspar, of the Guardia Civil police force and a specialist in organised crime, says: “Around 2000, these mafiosi from various countries, mainly in the East, set up operations centres in Murcia and Levante. They brought their bodyguards and conducted operations in their own countries from Spain. But now they have bases in Barcelona, Malaga, Valencia and Madrid. Their three main sources of income are arms, prostitution and drugs, and all of this produces money that has to be laundered.”

As we shall see, there are many factors that attract money-launderers to Spain, but the key element is construction, and to understand this, the sheer scale of building in Spain – and not just on the costa – has to be appreciated. In 2005, 800,000 new homes were built in Spain, more than in Britain, France and Germany put together. Another 860,000 are scheduled for 2006. One in every three new buildings in Europe is being built in Spain, to the point that there are now 23m homes for a population a of a little over 40m. Nearly 2m of these are officially empty, and far more are unoccupied for most of the year. Of the 800,000 built in 2005, only 350,000 were needed to cope with population growth and immigration. The rest, therefore, are second homes, concentrated on the Mediterranean coast. Altogether, 34% of Spain’s Mediterranean coast is already built up; the figure rises to above 50% in areas such as the Costa del Sol and Costa Blanca.

And it’s not just the coast. Up to 15 miles inland, in parts of Valencia and Andalusia, the countryside is disappearing. On the 25-mile stretch of road that runs inland from Marbella to Malaga, there are dozens of holiday developments. Marbella itself is a place apart, geographically in Spain but otherwise in a world of its own. It is not just some Skegness-in-the-sun like Torremolinos: it is more international than that, far more Dolce & Gabbana than fish and chips, a place for the pampered who can choose between any number of beauty and health clinics to prepare them for a browse around Prada or Cartier. Women with big hair and implants, 50-year-old men sporting 30-year-old abdominals – like an animated version of Hello!

This frenetic pace of development poses serious questions of sustainability, both because of Spain’s limited ability to generate electricity and its even more fragile water supplies. A huge new urban development of 13,500 flats near Toledo, south of Madrid, was given the green light despite the fact that there was insufficient water to maintain it. Water has since been diverted from hundreds of miles away.

The Toledo development, where permission had been granted by successive Partido Popular (the People’s party; conservative) and Socialist administrations, reflects official ambivalence towards the funding of property development.

All parties are implicated in, effectively, selling planning permissions. It is an open secret that this is a significant part of how political parties fund themselves, so nobody is in a position to throw stones. While it is impossible to say to what degree the government benefits directly from money-laundering (aside from the 16% Vat on all transactions), it is clear that if you took construction out of the Spanish economy, the country would be in a state of collapse.

Despite fears that Spain may be killing the golden goose if overdevelopment destroys its innate attractions, at present there is no sign of
a slowdown, and with demand high and supply sustained by dirty money, no power on earth seems capable of putting a brake on construction.

Close to 250,000 Britons are registered as permanent residents in Spain, with a further 133,000 Germans and about 300,000 other European nationals. These are figures for people who live here year-round, and don’t take into account those who spend a few weeks a year in their holiday villa or time-share. According to the Madrid Association of Construction Companies, 80,000 foreigners will buy homes in Spain this year, as they did in 2005, spending an average of e280,000 per home. Close to 2m Spanish homes are owned by foreigners. According to a study by Barclays, 65.7% of Britons choose Spain for their second home.

Even before the introduction of the euro and the arrival of organised crime, it was estimated that the black economy accounted for about
22% of Spain’s gross domestic product (GDP). Some of this derives from tax evasion – property isn’t always involved. But it is also the result
of a bureaucracy that places so many obstacles in the way of legitimate enterprises, such as setting up your own business. “It’s certainly much higher than 22%, because nobody knows how much black money is circulating. We’re dealing with something much more professional, and on a much bigger scale, than before,” say Ines Barba. She adds that competition between government and police agencies over who should control money-laundering and organised crime plays into the hands of the criminals. Spain did not set up an organised-crime squad until May this year. It is not that the police are overstretched, she says, so much as a lack of co-ordination, as well as a need to update the law.

What has changed is the level of corruption.


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  #2  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 22:22
galleta galleta está desconectado
Idealisto
 
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Pues como vaya corriendo la voz por el resto de Europa... no sé quién va a venir a ocupar tanta casita construida.

Y con la sequía que hay vamos a tener agua para todos, luz para todos...
o nos van a tener como en las galeras, remmmmmaaaaa!!!!!!.


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  #3  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 23:03
llangot llangot está desconectado
Yalodeciayoista
 
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el articulo da en el clavo perfectamente: CORRUPTION!!!!
ESTE ES EL MOTIVO DEL ACTUAL DESMADRE


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  #4  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 23:14
galleta galleta está desconectado
Idealisto
 
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"El hombre es un lobo para el hombre"

El peligro de un primer plano

http://www.caspa.tv/archivos/000867.html


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  #5  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 23:20
no vendo ná no vendo ná esta en línea ahora
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 06-abril-2006
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Iniciado por galleta
"El hombre es un lobo para el hombre"

El peligro de un primer plano

http://www.caspa.tv/archivos/000867.html

Joder, cuanto ladrón hay por el mundo.


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  #6  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 23:29
xtiago xtiago está desconectado
Decorador estilista
 
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Iniciado por no vendo ná
Pirates of the Mediterranean

... que te iba a decir... ¿que país tenía fama de "Piratas" (y de los verdaderos!)?



Ver Lista

Última edición por xtiago; 25-ago-2006 a las 23:33


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  #7  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 23:38
no vendo ná no vendo ná esta en línea ahora
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 06-abril-2006
Ubicación: Burbulandia
Mensajes: 4.972
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Iniciado por xtiago
... que te iba a decir... ¿que país tenía fama de "Piratas" (y de los verdaderos!)?



Ver Lista

Un pirata de esa época es de broma comparado con Roca y compañía.


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  #8  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 23:45
xtiago xtiago está desconectado
Decorador estilista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 31-diciembre-2005
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Iniciado por no vendo ná
Un pirata de esa época es de broma comparado con Roca y compañía.

jajaa, es cierto.
Pero no me lo podía guardar, un británico nos puede acusar de cualquier cosa... menos de pirata, que de eso tienen experiencia de sobra.


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  #9  
Antiguo 25-ago-2006, 23:58
no vendo ná no vendo ná esta en línea ahora
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 06-abril-2006
Ubicación: Burbulandia
Mensajes: 4.972
Gracias: 4.881
4.932 Agradecimientos de 1.569 mensajes
Iniciado por xtiago
jajaa, es cierto.
Pero no me lo podía guardar, un británico nos puede acusar de cualquier cosa... menos de pirata, que de eso tienen experiencia de sobra.

La verdad es que es irónico sí.


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  #10  
Antiguo 26-ago-2006, 02:27
El_Cuervo El_Cuervo está desconectado
Miembro del BCE
 
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Muy bueno! Un par de cosillas:

-Solo has copiado la mitad del articulo, que el articulo tiene dos paginas. Si quereis leer el resto pinchad en el enlace, aunque ya os aviso que la otra parte quiza os guste menos, porque trata sobre todo de la prostitucion y especula si nos estamos convirtiendo en destino de turismo sexual.

Por ejemplo, nos encontramos con descacharrantes frases como:

"post-Franco Spain now offers sex at every turn, (...) on ubiquitous roadside puticlubs". Real como la vida misma. Pero a continuacion se pone a describir todo el negocio de la trata de blancas y de las mafias de la prostitucion, no se, me parece que no tiene nada que ver con la otra parte del articulo que trata de la inmigracion. En algunos momentos parece que estamos ante el peor periodismo de la leyenda negra .

Pero volviendo a la parte que nos interesa en este foro, a la parte inmobiliaria:

Iniciado por El articulo de the times
As we shall see, there are many factors that attract money-launderers to Spain, but the key element is construction, and to understand this, the sheer scale of building in Spain – and not just on the costa – has to be appreciated.(...)Of the 800,000 built in 2005, only 350,000 were needed to cope with population growth and immigration. The rest, therefore, are second homes, concentrated on the Mediterranean coast.
(...)
Despite fears that Spain may be killing the golden goose if overdevelopment destroys its innate attractions, at present there is no sign of
a slowdown, and with demand high and supply sustained by dirty money,

En ninguna parte del articulo se habla de especulacion inmobiliaria, ni de que la mayor parte de la demanda la hacen familias movidas por los tipos de interes reales negativos y no grupos extranjeros;
y en cuanto a la oferta, que duda cabe de que en la costa muchas operaciones de construccion sirven para lavar dinero, pero, y como ya se comento en el foro hace bastante, la promocion y construccion genera muchos beneficios de por si sin necesidad de usar el negocio como lavanderia: mas al contrario, los habituales pagos bajo mano lo que hacen es introducir dinero b en el sistema, no eliminarlo.

Yo creo que el periodista no ha entendido bien el problema que tenemos aqui, y ha aplicado la siguente logica:
1 - En españa cada vez hay mas prostitucion
2 - En españa cada vez hay mas dinero negro
3 - En españa cada vez se construye mas
4 - La demanda de casas para vivir se ha acabado pero las casas se siguen vendiendo sin que nadie viva en ellas
5 - Por tanto: la prostitucion esta generando dinero negro, que los españoles al no poder declararlo lo gastan en construir casas y a continuacion venderlas a ingleses que sin saberlo contribuyen al negocio, o venderlas a españoles que tambien estan blanqueando su dinero negro. Los rumanos malosos traficantes de blancas tambien lavan su dinero en apartamentos en la costa, al igual que los traficantes de drogas gallegos y demas crimen organizado.

Una logica curiosa cuanto menos. No toda españa es como marbella, ¿no?
¿ o si ?

El problema que tenemos es que usamos la misma palabra para referirnos al dinero proveniente de beneficios actividades ilegales como los traficos de mujeres, que el dinero que no aparece para evitar el pago de impuestos. Si hiciesemos como en francia, con (dinero negro/dinero gris) a lo mejor este articulo hubiese estado un poco mejor encaminado.

No se, da un dato sobre black money de evasion de impuestos y a continuacion es una descripcion de como se genera el black money por prostitucion y tal. Esto es un non-sequitur. El mismo se clava el cuchillo cuando dice:
While it is impossible to say to what degree the government benefits directly from money-laundering aside from the 16% Vat on all transactions

Si es justo al reves, cuanto mas negro haya en las transacciones mas dinero pierde el gobierno, la mayoria las veces se escritura por debajodel valor del piso para evitar impuestos. El resto si podrán ser escrituraciones por encima del valor para blanquear, pero el caso es que el periodista confunde estas dos cosas que no tienen nada que ver y lo mete todo en el mismo saco.

[ironic mode=on]
Porque no se, como las conclusiones que se desprenden sean verdad, los burbujistas tenemos nuevo argumento contra los especuladores: ahora podremos acusarlos, ademas de inmorales por jugar con un bien basico, de financiar a las mafias de la prostitucion, dronja y armas.
[ironic mode=off]

En fin, puedo estar equivocado. Si alguien entiende otra cosa que me saque del error, por favor.


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