Burbuja.info - Foro de economía > > > La Fed va a seguir subiendo los tipos... pronto al 6,5%
Respuesta
 
Herramientas Desplegado
  #1  
Antiguo 23-ago-2006, 16:37
tochovista tochovista está desconectado
Agarrao a las kalandrakas
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 06-julio-2006
Mensajes: 1.801
Gracias: 7
2.619 Agradecimientos de 272 mensajes
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,

Última edición por tochovista; 20-oct-2006 a las 13:14


Responder Citando
  #2  
Antiguo 23-ago-2006, 21:40
Ladislao Ladislao está desconectado
Miembro del BCE
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 01-junio-2006
Mensajes: 500
Gracias: 0
31 Agradecimientos de 8 mensajes
Ese 6,5% lo veo complicado, más que nada porque la economía yanqui está dando síntomas de flaqueza y su particular burbuja está al borde del estallido. Apretar mucho las tuercas puede generar una debacle en toda regla.

El presidente de la FED tiene un papelón por delante. Este sí que tiene que jugar con su bola de cristal. ¿Asumirá un valor alto de inflación para no sacrificar el crecimiento?. En principio no debería, pero... ahí está una enorme burbuja inmobiliaria que amenaza como espada de Damocles.

El presi de la Reserva Federal ya empieza a moverse por valores peligrosos en cuanto a tipos de interés. Personalmente aguantaría con los tipos al 5,25% una temporada a costa de la inflación. Su valor todavía no es preocupante, tiene margen y la burbuja acojona, demasiado. No me gustaría estar en su pellejo.


Responder Citando
  #3  
Antiguo 23-ago-2006, 22:52
Aqui_No_Hay_Quien_Viva Aqui_No_Hay_Quien_Viva está desconectado
Grandísimo Gurú burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 28-junio-2006
Mensajes: 3.161
Gracias: 541
2.947 Agradecimientos de 984 mensajes
He leído varios analistas durante estos meses comentando la evolución de los i y la conclusión es que hacían es que aún tenían recorrido aunque no acertaban a decir la cantidad y la periodicidad, hablaban de períodos de 4 meses a 6 a partir de ahora ( que cada uno saque las conclusiones que quiera cuando las subidas del BCE van a pasar de períodos trimestrales a bimensuales, hay prisa parece??)
.


Responder Citando
  #4  
Antiguo 23-ago-2006, 23:46
Marai Marai está desconectado
Excelentísimo, ilustrísimo y grandísimo miembro de élite de los gurús burbujistas
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 31-julio-2006
Mensajes: 8.088
Gracias: 847
6.902 Agradecimientos de 2.005 mensajes
Recent Macro Indicators Strongly Reinforce My Recession Call...
Nouriel Roubini | Aug 20, 2006
The macroeconomic indicators published in the last week or so have strongly reinforced my out-of-consensus view that the US economy will fall into a recession by early 2007: quite simply most of them are headed sharply south, consistent with a sharp deceleration in growth in H2 that will lead to a recession by 2007.

First, consumer confidence is sharply down as consumers are in a foul mood. No surprise as the three bears of slumping housing, high oil and the delayed effects of rising policy rates are beating down a consumer with falling real wages, negative savings, high debt ratios, rising debt servicing ratios and mediocre job growth.

Second, all indicators of the housing sector show not just a slowdown, not just a slump but an outright rout in the housing sector. As, the Toll Brothers (the homebuilders known for the McMansions of the roaring housing bubble times) put it last week this is the worst housing oversupply slump in the last 40 years. And this is not just the self-serving view of a once high-flying homebuilder whose stock prices is collapsing along that of all Reits and other homebuilders. All the indicators from the housing sectors - including the latest housing starts and homebuilders (NAHB) forward looking business conditions - indicate a housing sector that is literally in free fall. Real residential investment already fell at an annualized rate of 6.4% in Q2; expect it to fall at rates of 12-15% for the next few quarters. And, as I have argued before, the wealth effects and the employment effects of this housing meltdown will be severe, much larger than the effect of the tech sector bust in 2000-2001.

Third, consistent with this housing rout, lending indicators - both for housing and consumer loans - are also headed south. While the supply of credit is not getting tighter, the demand for credit by firms and households is sharply slowing. Of course, the slowdown in the demand for home mortgage related to the housing slump. But now you are also seeing lower demand for C&I loans; this suggests that investment spending may be falling ahead, as already signaled by Q2 data on real investment in equipment and software. Moreover, home equity withdrawal (HEW) will be sharply down soon enough once the housing price flattening turns into an outright fall in average housing prices (such prices already starting to fall in the bubble regions of the US). And with lessened HEW, the ability of households with negative savings to consume more than their incomes - as they have been doing for two years with negative savings - will be severely curtailed.

Fourth, car sales are now falling in real terms. And as Floyd Norris pointed out over the weekend in the New York Times, car sales are one of the strongest leading indicators of US recessions. Consistent with the car dealers' doldrums, Ford now is announcing a sharp cut in production for the rest of the year. While Ford's problems - and the risk that it may eventually end up in Chapter 11 - are partly specific to this firm - as Japanese transplants in the US are doing well and gaining market shares on the Detroit Big Three - the aggregate automotive sales figures signal that the auto slump is not specific to Ford but an aggregate sector wide phenomenon. And the auto sector slump is not unrelated to the housing slump. As the FT put it on Saturday, the sharp fall in the sales of Ford's pick-up trucks is related to the housing slump as such truck are widely purchased by real estate contractors. And indeed in Q2 real consumer durables (that include both cars, home appliances and furniture all related to housing) already fell, consistent with the view that we have now have a glut in the stock of consumer durables (durables consumption has a investment-like nature to it as such goods last for a long time).

Fifth, other business cycle indicators are also signaling weakness ahead: the Empire State business index, a leading indicator, is sharply softening; inventories are up and figures for May and June have been revised upward. While such revision may boost the revised Q2 figure to 3% from the initial 2.5% this is an ominous signal: with inventories of unsold goods even higher than initially estimated in Q2 and with final sales growing only a 2% rate, the slowdown in demand will force an inventory adjustment in Q3 and Q4 via a reduction in production, thus impart further downward direction to H2 growth.

This wide range of indicators clearly suggests that the economy is headed south with the growth slowdown in H2 likely to be much sharper than in Q2. Of course, cheerleading Goldilocks optimists are systematically biased towards a bullish view of the world. For example, last Friday I was interviewed by CNBC’s Squawk Box: after presenting my bearish views on the economy and on the equity markets, the cheerful anchor concluded with a totally non-consequential: “I guess this is probably a buying opportunity!” (sic!). How could have concluded with such a bullish spin is unfathomable. Of course, once a recession leads to a bearish equity markets with valuations 15-20% below current ones, we may get some buying opportunity at the bottom of the cycle; but certainly not now when P/E ratios are still high on a cyclically adjusted basis. But for perma bulls no fact can shatter their cheerful and deluded view that markets can only go up.

And what are the recent “good” news that perma optimists hold on for their bullish views? Most of them are not that “good” once you scratch the headline figure and look at the details.

First, perma bulls are cheered by the PPI and CPI figures. Indeed, as I suggested weeks ago markets are a few steps behind the curve. I argued that the coming recession will imply a slowdown in inflationary pressure and lead the Fed to cut rates in the fall or winter. But the market consensus, after the FOMC meetings, was still whether the pause will continue or whether inflation would force the Fed to hike again in the fall. The PPI and CPI figures shattered altogether the chances of a hike and made clear that the pause is a stop. But markets have not yet digested that this stop will next lead to a cut once the recession signals are clear. And the softening of the inflation pressures – save for additional energy shocks - is consistent with a softening economy and labor markets. And indeed the equity market rally in recent days is consistent with my view of a suckers’ rally following the Fed pause and future cut. After the FOMC meeting markets were still uncertain on whether the pause was permanent or a pause before another hike; it had not dawned on them that the coming recession implies that the next Fed move would be a cut. Thus, the market rally was tentative; it is only after the PPI and CPI nailed the hike scenario into a clear coffin that equity markets rallied in the typical suckers’ rally based on expectations that the Fed will come to the rescue of the economy and markets. But wait until signals of the incoming recession are stronger for markets to sharply fall when the reality of a recession leading to falling earnings and profits sinks in the mind of investors.

Second, chattering cheerleaders of an ever rising market are cheered by the industrial production data for July. But if you exclude utilities – sharply up on a seasonal basis because of the weather – manufacturing production is up a miser 0.1%, consistent with an economic slowdown.

Third, forever Panglossians are reassured by the low initial claims of unemployment benefits numbers. But low figures for such claims have been consistent for the last four months with a most sluggish labor market where a pathetic 112K jobs have been created per month on average including July when the unemployment rate started to increase. So, there is little to cheer on the labor market front. Also labor market indicators are well known to be lagging rather than leading. When demand first slows down, firm do not cut production or employment; they just let inventories of unsold goods to increase. Only after the fall in sales persists for a while firms will start to cut production to avoid an excessive pile up of unsold goods. And even then firms will tend to hold on their workers – and cut production via reduced capacity use - as losing skilled workers is costly: it is only when the fall in demand and production is significant enough that workers are fired and jobs cut. Thus, employment is a lagging indicator of the business cycle; and the fact that job growth has been dismal for four months now in spite of not being yet in a full fledged recession is an ominous signal for what the labor market will do once the recession is in full swing.

Fourth, optimists sighed a major relief when the July retail sales numbers were sharply up; the spin was that the consumer was entering Q3 with a roar. Of course, observers failed to notice that once you strip sales from gasoline purchases and once you correct nominal figure for the high rate of inflation, the real retail sales are much weaker than the headline. Also, retail sales – especially their non-durables component – are usually the last shoe to drop. In 2000 while the sharp US slowdown – that led to the 2001 recession - was underway real retail sales remained robust until Q3 and they crawled to a stop only in Q4: by September 2000 retail sales were still growing at a rate close to double digits and went into a stop only in December. Also, Q2 figure show that real durable consumption is already falling while non-durable consumption was growing at a modest 2% plus rate. The only component of consumption that was still perky in Q2 – in the double digit real annualized growth rate – was that of services.
...
http://www.rgemonitor.com/blog/roubini/142140/


Responder Citando
  #5  
Antiguo 24-ago-2006, 00:06
Deadzoner Deadzoner está desconectado
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-junio-2006
Mensajes: 4.790
Gracias: 73
438 Agradecimientos de 109 mensajes
Buenisimo, a la par que siniestro.
Me quedo con
Of course, once a recession leads to a bearish equity markets with valuations 15-20% below current ones, we may get some buying opportunity at the bottom of the cycle; but certainly not now when P/E ratios are still high on a cyclically adjusted basis. But for perma bulls no fact can shatter their cheerful and deluded view that markets can only go up.



Responder Citando
  #6  
Antiguo 24-ago-2006, 10:38
falldown75 falldown75 está desconectado
Baneable
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 14-agosto-2006
Ubicación: En mi casa
Mensajes: 278
Gracias: 52
109 Agradecimientos de 62 mensajes
Buenas a todos/as.

Me parece bien que pegueis articulos e informacion acerca de temas de economia , finanzas y vivienda ( y mejor en ingles) pero sinceramente no me creeria ni la mitad de lo que en ellos se dice ( aunque hay que reconocer que este que nos ocupa esta bastante razonado). Deciros , por experiencia , que por cada articulo que salga en una direccion hay otro en la direccion contraria , lo que uno recomienda otro lo desmiente...¿ quien nos dice a nosotros que la persona que escribe esa noticia no esta como nosotros , viviendo una burbuja inmobiliaria ( que la hay en USA) y deseando que esto caiga como un deseperado? . No es bueno en mi opnion agarrarse a un clavo ardiendo , hay que tomar los datos y analizarlos por uno mismo para llegar a una serie de conclusiones.
Por cierto , nadie comento ayer que el euribor cayo un 1.34% . Ni que la bolsa lleva 3 dias cayendo... ¿ es que ahora ya no es rentable invertir en bolsa y cuando esta en maximos si...?

Por favor , seamos serios en nuestro analisis.

( http://elmundodinero2.elmundo.es/mun...97812_244.html )

Un saludo


Responder Citando
  #7  
Antiguo 24-ago-2006, 10:47
Deadzoner Deadzoner está desconectado
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-junio-2006
Mensajes: 4.790
Gracias: 73
438 Agradecimientos de 109 mensajes
Iniciado por falldown75
Por cierto , nadie comento ayer que el euribor cayo un 1.34% . Ni que la bolsa lleva 3 dias cayendo... ¿ es que ahora ya no es rentable invertir en bolsa y cuando esta en maximos si...?

Por favor , seamos serios en nuestro analisis.

( http://elmundodinero2.elmundo.es/mun...97812_244.html )

Un saludo

Está muy bien que lo puntualices.
¿Ves una tendencia de bajada del euribor? Si es así, ¿Por qué? ¿Te has fijado en el euribor a 6 meses? ¿Por que no ha bajado?
Para que baje el euribor tiene que haber una bajada de la inflación. El resto, al BCE, le da igual, como se ha discutido en otro hilo.
¿Ves una tendencia a la bajada de la bolsa? Si es así, ¿Por qué?
Las mayores bajadas son de inmobiliarias y constructoras en estos 3 días...


Responder Citando
  #8  
Antiguo 24-ago-2006, 11:24
falldown75 falldown75 está desconectado
Baneable
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 14-agosto-2006
Ubicación: En mi casa
Mensajes: 278
Gracias: 52
109 Agradecimientos de 62 mensajes
Buenas a todos/as:

Vamos a ver , lo que yo quiero decir es que no se pueden dar aseveraciones tajantes en razon a una noticia. Ayer , la FED no descartaba nuevas subidas de interes PERO estan seran PREVENTIVAS y no CORRECTIVAS. A continuacion salia la noticia de que las ventas de viviendas de segunda mano habian bajado , sintoma de enfriamiento de la econimia ( menos inflacion)...Dos noticias procedentes del otro lado del atlantico que sin ser contradictorias dan una idea de lo que se cuece por alli. Tipos al 6.5% , lo dudo.

Te respondo a tus preguntas:

1- No veo una tendencia a la baja del Euribor , veo subidas moderadas ( nada de tipos al 5 o al 6% el proximo año ) salvo que el petroleo se ponga a 100-150 $ cosa que nadie puede preveer ( depende de factores externos a la economia como puede ser la tension en oriente medio ). Si el euribor a largo plazo ( 12M) baja implica subidas moderadas o nulas a L/P y si el de medio plazo ( 6M) no baja es que tendremos unos tipos de interes entorno al 3.5% al final de año.
2- Que los tipos de interes bajen , depende efectivamente de la evolucion de precios...pero de la zona EURO. De hecho ( hablo de memoria) creo que la inflaccion Alemana esta por debajo del 2.5% que era la media de la UE ( la suben paises como españa , grecia , letonia...). Y no nos equivoquemos , quien manda en el BCE es Alemania y Francia. Habria que ver si a Alemania y francia le convienen tipos de interes altos.
3- La mayoria de las inmobiliarias en la bolsa estan metidas en movimientos corporativos por lo que sus movimientos no son "limpios". En dias pasados la bolsa subio por rumores de OPA obre BBVA y NH Hoteles... Agosto no es un mes representativo y la gran parte de la subida de los ultimos meses es debida de a resultados expectaculares ( banca e inmobiliarias). Creeme todavia no hay signos de distribucion ( de las manos fuertes ) en la bolsa española por lo que no hay sintomas de caida.

Un saludo


Responder Citando
  #9  
Antiguo 24-ago-2006, 11:51
HAL 9000 HAL 9000 está desconectado
Miembro del BCE
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 28-abril-2006
Ubicación: Navarra
Mensajes: 582
Gracias: 4.577
808 Agradecimientos de 282 mensajes
Iniciado por falldown75
Buenas a todos/as:

1- No veo una tendencia a la baja del Euribor , veo subidas moderadas ( nada de tipos al 5 o al 6% el proximo año ) salvo que el petroleo se ponga a 100-150 $ cosa que nadie puede preveer ( depende de factores externos a la economia como puede ser la tension en oriente medio ).
Un saludo

Mec! error,

Me parece que hay gente que sí que lo puede preveer. Es más, Bill Clinton el 7 de julio de 2006 en una entrevista decía que cuando el "reinaba" nadie le dijo nada acerca del peak oil.
Peeero, al igual que "El desconocimiento de la ley no exime de su cumplimiento", el desconocimiento del Peak oil no exime de su cumplimiento.


http://minnesota.publicradio.org/dis...07/11/midday2/

Estaba leyendo el otro día un libro en el que un tipo me criticaba con dureza, afirmando que estaba seguro de que la CIA me informaba semanalmente de cómo América se estaba quedando sin petróleo y no estábamos haciendo nada serio acerca de esto. (...) Que yo sepa, nunca he tenido un informe de seguridad en el que se dijesen las cosas que estos geólogos del petróleo muy serios pero muy conservadores dicen, que es que piensan que o ahora o antes de que acabe la década llegaremos al cenit de la producción de petróleo global y que con el alza de China e India y otros que vendrán, o reducimos dramáticamente nuestro uso del petróleo o se nos acabará el petróleo recuperable de 35 a 50 años. (...) Hay una buena posibilidad de que esta gente, que se ha ganado la vida todos estos años estudiando los depósitos petroleros sepan de lo que hablan, y podríamos no tener tanto petróleo como pensábamos. Así que necesitamos ponernos en marcha.

Y eso es precisamente lo que se está haciendo. O acaso alguien cree que lo de Irak fueron ganas de implantar una democracia... o que Irán tenga un progama nuclear para producir energía...


Responder Citando
  #10  
Antiguo 24-ago-2006, 12:10
Deadzoner Deadzoner está desconectado
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-junio-2006
Mensajes: 4.790
Gracias: 73
438 Agradecimientos de 109 mensajes
Iniciado por falldown75
Buenas a todos/as:

Vamos a ver , lo que yo quiero decir es que no se pueden dar aseveraciones tajantes en razon a una noticia. Ayer , la FED no descartaba nuevas subidas de interes PERO estan seran PREVENTIVAS y no CORRECTIVAS. A continuacion salia la noticia de que las ventas de viviendas de segunda mano habian bajado , sintoma de enfriamiento de la econimia ( menos inflacion)...Dos noticias procedentes del otro lado del atlantico que sin ser contradictorias dan una idea de lo que se cuece por alli. Tipos al 6.5% , lo dudo.

Estoy totalmente de acuerdo, no se puede aseverar.
Nada mas lejos de mi intención, al menos, el ser tajante, salvo en temas como el zenith del endeudamiento, por ejemplo.
Muchas veces se me olvida lo de poner "en mi opinión", que de economía no tengo ninguna formación, etc...
Iniciado por falldown75
Te respondo a tus preguntas:

1- No veo una tendencia a la baja del Euribor , veo subidas moderadas ( nada de tipos al 5 o al 6% el proximo año ) salvo que el petroleo se ponga a 100-150 $ cosa que nadie puede preveer ( depende de factores externos a la economia como puede ser la tension en oriente medio ). Si el euribor a largo plazo ( 12M) baja implica subidas moderadas o nulas a L/P y si el de medio plazo ( 6M) no baja es que tendremos unos tipos de interes entorno al 3.5% al final de año.

Por lo que yo se, que es muy poco, lo que temen es que se transmita el coste de la energía a todo el sistema. Por eso prefieren subir los tipos aunque no esté subiendo mucho la inflación.

http://www.finanzas.com/id.9100278/noticias/noticia.htm
Sobre este tema realizó también reflexiones otro miembro de la Fed, Guynn. ¿Datos mensuales? Mejor enfocarse en la tendencia, tanto en el caso de los datos de inflación como en los de crecimiento. Pero con una advertencia: el riesgo que supone a medio plazo no tomar las decisiones adecuadas para controlar la inflación, para lo que pone como ejemplo la actuación de los años 70. También se mostró optimista para la evolución de la economía norteamericana, cerca de su crecimiento potencial.

Por tanto, no se si les llevará al 6,5%, pero no se puede descartar.
Mejor recesión que inflación alta, parece ser el mensaje.

Iniciado por falldown75
2- Que los tipos de interes bajen , depende efectivamente de la evolucion de precios...pero de la zona EURO. De hecho ( hablo de memoria) creo que la inflaccion Alemana esta por debajo del 2.5% que era la media de la UE ( la suben paises como españa , grecia , letonia...). Y no nos equivoquemos , quien manda en el BCE es Alemania y Francia. Habria que ver si a Alemania y francia le convienen tipos de interes altos.

Totalmente de acuerdo, de hecho, si su inflación sube, y la nuestra baja, el euribor no se verá afectado.
Pero también contribuímos al efecto. Nuestra inflación afecta a la eurozona, igual que nuestro crecimiento.
Iniciado por falldown75
3- La mayoria de las inmobiliarias en la bolsa estan metidas en movimientos corporativos por lo que sus movimientos no son "limpios". En dias pasados la bolsa subio por rumores de OPA obre BBVA y NH Hoteles... Agosto no es un mes representativo y la gran parte de la subida de los ultimos meses es debida de a resultados expectaculares ( banca e inmobiliarias). Creeme todavia no hay signos de distribucion ( de las manos fuertes ) en la bolsa española por lo que no hay sintomas de caida.

Estoy de acuerdo, el volumen en agosto es ridículo y se tiran las cotizaciones con facilidad (ha habido recompras y ampliaciones a bajo precio). Ciertos presidentes de inmobiliarias haciendo caja, etc.


Responder Citando
Respuesta

Herramientas
Desplegado


Temas Similares
Tema Autor Foro Respuestas Último mensaje
La Vivienda Va Seguir Subiendo !!! iaio Burbuja Inmobiliaria 38 06-ago-2008 21:40
¿va A Seguir Subiendo La Inflacion? isaac29 Burbuja Inmobiliaria 6 08-jun-2008 14:27
¡¡Por esta razón va a seguir Trichet subiendo los tipos!! Fmercury1980 Burbuja Inmobiliaria 0 19-oct-2007 10:06
Citi: la crisis forzará al BCE a desistir de su idea de seguir subiendo tipos El_Presi Burbuja Inmobiliaria 0 21-sep-2007 17:36
Vamos a seguir subiendo No Registrado Burbuja Inmobiliaria 4 08-jun-2006 21:34


La franja horaria es GMT +1. Ahora son las 20:43.