Burbuja.info - Foro de economía > > > Spain has more reason to quit the euro than Italy
Respuesta
 
Herramientas Desplegado
  #1  
Antiguo 11-jul-2006, 23:12
Mr Bubble Mr Bubble está desconectado
Madmaxista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 19-junio-2006
Mensajes: 135
Gracias: 7
4 Agradecimientos de 4 mensajes
Dado el nivel de estudios del foro, y quemuchos son expats, creo que no hace falta traducción, y los comentarios os les dejo para vosotros, es de hace unos meses, pero viendo que hay mucha gente nueva, creo que es interesante recuperarlo...A los que critican..no lo hemos escrito en este foro, remitiros al autor que tiene pinta de saber de lo que habla.
Por cierto semos cojonudos, nos comparan con los EEUU...

Spain has more reason to quit the euro than Italy

By Wolfgang Munchau (Financial Times)

There was a revealing incident at the World Economic Forum in Davos this year. Nouriel Roubini, the New York-based international economist, took part in a panel discussion during which he raised questions about Italy's future in the eurozone. A fellow panellist was Giulio Tremonti, the Italian finance minister. Professor Roubini wrote in his web log* that his presentation "caused a stir with Minister Tremonti who interrupted me in the middle of my remarks, went into a temper tantrum and shouted: 'Go back to Turkey!' I happen to have been born in Istanbul."

Perhaps one should not conclude too much from this incident, but it does show one thing: European officials are getting nervous about the future of the euro. A few years ago, no one would have raised an eyebrow.

Italy is often mentioned as the country most likely to leave the euro. I disagree. Leaving the euro would not solve any of Italy's problems. Since Italy's debt is mostly euro-denominated, Italy would be facing an Argentinian-style debt crisis. A wise Italian politician told me recently that Italy was more likely to disintegrate as a nation state than to leave the euro.

If any country ever decided to quit, unlikely as this may be, that country would be Spain, not Italy. Over the past seven years, Spain has lost even more competitiveness against the eurozone than Italy. At the same time, Spain is also in a better position to quit. With a debt-to-gross-domestic- product ratio of just over 40 per cent, Spain would have no problem servicing its debts.

Unlike Italy, Spain enjoys the reputation of a European success story. But its economic success rests on shaky ground. It was driven by a housing bubble, during which average property prices have increased almost threefold since 1997. The US and UK housing markets have been well behaved by comparison.

The Spanish housing bubble was caused by a combination of financial deregulation, rising domestic incomes and strong demand from foreign investors. Deregulation has a one-off effect. The contribution of the other two will fade over time. Spain is no doubt an attractive country to live in. But northern Europeans will not continue to invest in a skyrocketing Spanish property market for ever. There is a lot of cheap real estate around the Mediterranean, for example, in Croatia and Turkey.

The house-price bubble has kept the Spanish economy ticking over - and overshadowed Spain's underlying problem of falling competitiveness. Successive Spanish governments have failed to put in place the one condition essential for a country to prosper in the eurozone in the long run - a sufficient degree of wage and price flexibility. Since the beginning of monetary union in 1999, Spain gradually lost competitiveness against the rest of the eurozone, as its inflation rate exceeded the eurozone's by an average of more than 1 percentage point each year. Last year, the gap widened to 1.5 percentage points. If this were to go on for another seven years, there would hardly be a Spanish export industry left.

The country's current account deficit for the first 11 months of 2005 reached 7.3 per cent of GDP. In its latest autumn forecast, the European Commission put the current account deficit at 8.3 per cent this year, and 9.1 per cent in 2007. These are unsustainable levels.

There are some parallels - and one fundamental difference - between Spain and the US. Both countries have a housing bubble - and plenty of economists in denial over it. In both countries, consumers are spending as if there is no tomorrow. And both have lost global competitiveness.

The difference is that Spain is a member of a monetary union. The only way for Spain to regain lost competitiveness is through a long period of wage moderation. The eventual adjustment in the US economy will almost certainly be eased through a weaker dollar.

In Spain, the ratio of average house prices to average incomes is much higher than in other countries with property bubbles. Daniel Gros, director of the Centre for European Policy Studies in Brussels, noted that construction makes up an incredible 17 per cent of Spain's GDP -which is higher than in Germany right after unification**. He predicts that north and south European economies will eventually trade places. German economic growth will gradually improve, while Spain is about to experience a German-style economic stagnation, or worse.

While Spain is more likely to leave the eurozone than Italy, the odds of either country quitting are still small. If faced with a straight choice of a long economic depression and an even longer period of political isolation within the EU, both countries would opt for the former. The real danger for the eurozone is not a break-up, but continued failure. As the boom-bust cycle turns ugly, we should expect to see more irascible finance ministers in southern Europe.

Spain unlikely even to contemplate leaving the euro By Paul Isbell Published: February 21 2006 Sir, I agree with Wolfgang Munchau that it is unlikely that Italy would ever abandon the euro ("Spain has reason to quit euro", February 20). To do so would likely provoke the most severe financial crisis that Italy has experienced since the interwar period. Mr Munchau's reflections on Spain, however, deserve some comment.

It is true that Spain has accumulated intense disequilibria during the past decade, as the pattern of Spanish growth has become increasingly Anglo-Saxon, powered by strong consumer demand and underpinned by low interest rates, rising private debt and skyrocketing housing prices. Ironically, as Mr Munchau points out, Spain's short-term economic fate is linked inversely to Germany's: the longer Germany stagnates and the more slowly interest rates rise, the better chance Spain has of extending its bubble economy. But should Germany rise - and European Central Bank rates along with it - Spain will be increasingly vulnerable.

Spain's growth model suffers from one big difference with the US: a lack of productivity growth. This is even more important than nominal wage growth (which in fact has been moderate in Spain) in undermining Spanish competitiveness and represents the single biggest long-term threat to an otherwise successful Spanish economic transition. It is also the most difficult kind of economic weakness to remedy.

True, Spain lacks the capacity to regain competitiveness through currency devaluation. However, this is not the great unbearable vulnerability that Mr Munchau suggests but rather Spain's mighty shield against contagion from Latin America, where Spain is highly exposed. While Spain's national debt in absolute and relative terms is smaller than that of Italy's, its exposure to the "Latam effect" is much higher. Had Spain not been a member of the Economic and Monetary Union during the Argentine crisis and the near-default in Brazil, it would have long ago suffered from devaluation, stock market weakness, a decline in the housing market and, likely, a recession. In that scenario, the Spanish Socialist Workers' party victory in 2004 would not have come as a surprise.

But Spain will be the last man holding the euro flag. While the country faces a correction sooner or later, such an adjustment - and all future ones - would certainly be much more severe should Spain ever even contemplate the possibility of exiting the euro.

Paul Isbell,

Senior Analyst for International Economy,

Elcano Royal Institute for International and Strategic Studies


Responder Citando
  #2  
Antiguo 12-jul-2006, 04:17
epicureista epicureista está desconectado
Pequeño Padawan
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 27-junio-2006
Mensajes: 78
Gracias: 0
0 Agradecimientos de 0 mensajes
O sea, que al estar en el euro nos hemos librado del "efecto contagio" de las últimas crisis sudamericanas; pero a partir de ahora, con los alemanes de nuevo viento en popa, nos las vamos a comer dobladas debido a nuestro "peculiar" modelo de crecimiento.

Sólo hay una cosa que no entiendo. Este hombre dice que el problema de españa es nuestra alta inflación, lo que nos provoca una pérdida de competitividad que sólo podrá ser recuperada con un largo período de moderación salarial (vaya putada de solución, por cierto). Sabiendo que el precio de la vivienda no se incluye en la inflación: ¿qué es lo que causa una inflación tan alta en relación al resto de Europa(el petroleo sube para todos), y qué influencia puede tener (si la tiene) la burbuja inmobiliaria en ella?

Un saludo.


Responder Citando
  #3  
Antiguo 12-jul-2006, 08:37
Razonable Razonable está desconectado
Reptiliano
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 03-febrero-2006
Mensajes: 424
Gracias: 0
3 Agradecimientos de 3 mensajes
Iniciado por epicureista
O sea, que al estar en el euro nos hemos librado del "efecto contagio" de las últimas crisis sudamericanas; pero a partir de ahora, con los alemanes de nuevo viento en popa, nos las vamos a comer dobladas debido a nuestro "peculiar" modelo de crecimiento.

Sólo hay una cosa que no entiendo. Este hombre dice que el problema de españa es nuestra alta inflación, lo que nos provoca una pérdida de competitividad que sólo podrá ser recuperada con un largo período de moderación salarial (vaya putada de solución, por cierto). Sabiendo que el precio de la vivienda no se incluye en la inflación: ¿qué es lo que causa una inflación tan alta en relación al resto de Europa(el petroleo sube para todos), y qué influencia puede tener (si la tiene) la burbuja inmobiliaria en ella?

Un saludo.

El puto euro:

1 moneda de cien pesetas = 1 euro
1000 pesetas = 10 euros
5000 pesetas = 50 euros.
10000 pesetas = 100 euros
10000000 pesetas = 100000 euros

Esta es la equivalencia a la que nos hemos sometido todos los españoles. Os cuento, hace ya tiempo fui con mi novia y unos amigos a una cafetería, donde tiene unas tartas de chocolate buenisimas. Pues bien, como los trozos de tarta eran muy grandes, nos pedimos para los cuatro dos trozos, junto con 4 cafes.

¿Sabéis cuanto costo la broma? 16 euros

La gracia que me hizo cuando el camarero se acerco para llevarse el dinero, y le pregunté ¿Oiga, está usted seguro que 2 trozos de tarta y 4 cafes son 2.500 pesetas?

El camarero, asombrado, volvio a mirar la cuenta y dijo, ¡ joder como engaña el euro!

Subida del 66% en tan solo cuatro años y los sueldos decreciendo un 0,5%

Que pena de políticos que tenemos, son bazofia y escoria que no sirven para nada.


Responder Citando
  #4  
Antiguo 12-jul-2006, 12:00
Mr Bubble Mr Bubble está desconectado
Madmaxista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 19-junio-2006
Mensajes: 135
Gracias: 7
4 Agradecimientos de 4 mensajes
A ver si está bien mi teoría respecto a la inflación. Básicamente, lo que estamos recibiendo ahora son X miles de millones de €s en créditos de los bancos, en los que los bancos españoles son meros intermediarios ya que este dinero proviene del exterior, si seguimos la cadena, este crédito se le da a un señor que ha comprado una casa, y se lo paga al vendedor, este que ha sacado un buen beneficio de la venta de su casa, recibirá una buena cantidad de dinero fresco que gastará en, un coche de lujo, unas vacaciones a todo trapo, un par de mariscadas…

Seguimos la cadena, y el del concesionario de coches, al vender una buena cantidad, también se pagará sus caprichos, así sucesivamente, con esto quiero explicar que el dinero que inyectan los bancos en el sistema, nos llega a todos y el consumo se incrementa, con lo cual, los precios suben., el problema? Que este dinero hay que devolverlo a los que nos han prestado.

Imaginaos que con el dinero que tenemos, creáramos empresas, las cuales investigaran en productos competitivos, y pudiéramos vender a otros países estos productos, también recibiríamos dinero del exterior y nos generaría unos beneficios que no habría que devolver a nadie, pero este segundo, es el modelo de crecimiento que no tenemos, el primero es el que no genera valor añadido.

Hay otro dato mu bueno, que es la confianza del consumidor, dato subjetivo, pero en el cual estamos que nos salimos, como dice el artículo, gastamos como si el mañana no exisitiera, que mas da?.Cuanto me ha dicho el kilo de manzanas? 8 €, tome 9 y le compra unas chucherias al niño.. Quién de vosotros sabe cuanto cuesta un kilo de patatas, el kilo de pollo, si os suben el precio un 10% lo notaís?El país va muy bien, vivimos todos de pm, hay trabajo para todos, se ha creado otra clase social, la del inmigrante, que nos hace sentir mas ricos(al haber una clase social, que se considera inferior, mucha gente piensa que ha subido un escalón para arriba en la pirámide)..¿para que vamos a ahorrar?.

Pero ahora tu sueltas en 4 telediarios que hay crisis, que las empresas cierran, que ha explotado la burbuja, y aunque todo sea mentira el clima social cambia y la gente se guarda sus euriños por lo que pueda pasar..baja la inflación, el precio de la vivienda... Y el caso es que el gobierno sabe q lo puede hacer y acabaría con la mayor parte de los problemas…claro que nos salvaría de la situación a cambio de su victoria en las próximas elecciones

Y lo de lo salarios(wages) como siempre, si hay crisis..moderación salarial, si la economía va bien… moderación salarial. Eso sí, si la gente se endeuda hasta las cejas(este es el problema real con la inflación en el país), no pasa nada…


Responder Citando
  #5  
Antiguo 12-jul-2006, 12:22
charliness charliness está desconectado
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 09-junio-2006
Mensajes: 4.394
Gracias: 19
458 Agradecimientos de 174 mensajes
Iniciado por Razonable
El puto euro:

1 moneda de cien pesetas = 1 euro
1000 pesetas = 10 euros
5000 pesetas = 50 euros.
10000 pesetas = 100 euros
10000000 pesetas = 100000 euros

Esta es la equivalencia a la que nos hemos sometido todos los españoles

Ahí, justo ahí está la cosa, junto con el aumento del consumo desaforado de los hipotecados por más del 100% del pisito y las entidades vampíricas tipo Cofidís, que han encontrado en España la gallina de los huevos de oro. Solo hay que pasar un dia por Mediamarkt para ves las salvajadas que hace la gente: - Ese plasma de 52 pulgadas de paioner por 5000 euros... yo lo quieroooo, voy a llamar a "vidalibre".-
Y supongo que muchos habreis pagado un café a cien pesetas el dia 31 de diciembre y el 2 de enero os habrán pedido 1 euro, impresionante. Al principio muchos bares se cortaron a la hora de hacer esto, pero al final lo hicieron progresivamente para que no se notara mucho, y así en todo. Yujuuu


Responder Citando
  #6  
Antiguo 12-jul-2006, 12:40
Expatriado por la burbuja Expatriado por la burbuja está desconectado
Multinick Premium
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 22-junio-2006
Mensajes: 218
Gracias: 0
Agradecido 14 veces en 1 mensaje
Buenisimo el articulo, pero sobre todo en lo que se refiere a los salarios ....
La que os espera a los que permaneceis en ese pais.
Adelante, seguid endeudando vuestro futuro, que lo podreis pagar con sueldos reales decrecientes.

Que pena me da, me parece que me quedo en el extranjero algo mas de lo que habia planeado...............


Responder Citando
  #7  
Antiguo 12-jul-2006, 21:45
Mr Bubble Mr Bubble está desconectado
Madmaxista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 19-junio-2006
Mensajes: 135
Gracias: 7
4 Agradecimientos de 4 mensajes
Iniciado por Expatriado por la burbuja
Buenisimo el articulo, pero sobre todo en lo que se refiere a los salarios ....
La que os espera a los que permaneceis en ese pais.
Adelante, seguid endeudando vuestro futuro, que lo podreis pagar con sueldos reales decrecientes.

Que pena me da, me parece que me quedo en el extranjero algo mas de lo que habia planeado...............

Pués si Exp., al final nos tocará congelación salarial, a los que no nos metimos y a los que se metieron, creo q dentro de un año se revisan los convenios en los cuales por ley se aplican las subidas salariales a todo un sector. En Alemania con la crisis se han suprimido y ahora cada empresa negocia por su cuenta(Modelo Volkswagen en Navarra, o se congelan ustedes el sueldo y me trabajan el fin de semana por la face o cerramos el chiringo), a ver que pasa aquí, pero creo q a los sindicatos les van a coger por los.... y al final pués pagaremos todos


Responder Citando
  #8  
Antiguo 07-oct-2006, 13:29
>> 47 << >> 47 << está desconectado
ir-
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 28-agosto-2006
Mensajes: 24.412
Gracias: 1.995
8.154 Agradecimientos de 3.994 mensajes
Iniciado por Mr Bubble
Pués si Exp., al final nos tocará congelación salarial, a los que no nos metimos y a los que se metieron,

Subo este hilo, porque el primero articulo sigue pareciendo tremendamente vigente.

Para lograr una devaluación, habría que salir del euro durante un par de años sin avisar, para luego volverse a incorporar con una equivalencia de 200 pesetas como mínimo en vez de 166. Sin embargo tanto para la incorporación a la peseta, como para el regreso al euro dos años despues, habría dos redondeos al alza. Nunca a la baja, puesto que this is Spain ...menos de los salarios. Con ello se lograría la devaluación soñada para mantener insuflada la burbura, inversión extranjera planetaria, y encima con los salarios más devaluados respecto al resto, que es lo que quieren los peces gordos y mandamases del complejo politicomediaticofinanciero.


Responder Citando
  #9  
Antiguo 07-oct-2006, 14:28
Eddy Eddy está desconectado
Grandísimo miembro de la élite burbujista
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 01-octubre-2006
Mensajes: 4.999
Gracias: 5
7.944 Agradecimientos de 1.621 mensajes
Sólo hay un pequeño problema respecto a repetir la jugada del 92/93. La burbuja inmobiliaria se ha financiado con ahorro externo (sobre todo estos ultimos años), es decir, vía cedulas, títulos hipotecarios, mercado interbancario, las entidades financieras mantienen una deuda con extranjeros apabullantes, pero que no esta lejos de los 300.000.000 €,(si, eso son alrededor de 50 billones de pesetas).

Una devaluación importante (y una ligera no resolvería nada) devastaría al sistema financiero español.

Sus activos (créditos concedidos) valdrían logicamente un % menos igual al importe de la devaluación, mientras sus deudas con el exterior se mantendrían igual.

Siempre está la opción argentina, claro, decirle a los alemanes que no se les devuelve el 100% de lo que nos prestaron, sino el 80% ó el 70%, y a lo largo de 25 años.

El euro no tiene mecanismo de escape. Si se sale de él se hará en condiciones caóticas. Pretender que los bancos van a seguir prestando como si nada antes y después de la devaluación es una quimera.

Si el sistema financiero español sobrevive a esa devaluación inevitablemente se contraerá el volúmen de crédito interno.


Responder Citando
Respuesta

Herramientas
Desplegado


Temas Similares
Tema Autor Foro Respuestas Último mensaje
Roubini Never More Pessimistic on Euro Area, Calls Spain a Risk Eddy Burbuja Inmobiliaria 3 27-ene-2010 12:53
Trichet’s Vision Unravels as Investors Shun Italy, Spain Debt Sylar Burbuja Inmobiliaria 3 29-ene-2009 12:49
Euro Falls Toward One-Month Low on ECB Outlook, Spain’s Rating Lorena Burbuja Inmobiliaria 1 13-ene-2009 06:51
Spain Will Only Accept Highest-Rated Bonds, Excludes Italy El_Presi Burbuja Inmobiliaria 3 20-jun-2008 16:57
Spain rues the day it joined the euro Tupper Burbuja Inmobiliaria 11 16-jun-2007 09:59


La franja horaria es GMT +1. Ahora son las 21:03.